Trump Vs Ball

In today’s news or sports reports it is common to see the faces of either President Donald Trump making news in sports for all the wrong reasons or the father of NBA rookie Lonzo Ball Lavar Ball. These two names have been the headlines of news for their respective reasons whether on twitter or through media influence and branding of his children in each case. All of that came to a head when these two brash and cocky individuals collided on the case of Lavar’s son Li Angelo Ball who was arrested in China for shoplifting a pair of expensive glasses along with two other teammates.

Trump claims to be the reason for the UCLA basketball players release taking to twitter to look for credit in his role of getting the kids out of the prison. Trump displayed mediation and arbitration as a neutral third party to find a basis to have the kids released from the prison. Lavar on the other hand wanted nothing to do with Trump claiming his role was over-hyped in the freedom of the children. He also believed Trump’s warrant for thank you wasn’t necessary in his interview with ESPN saying “who?”, “What was he over there for?” When asked further comments on the situation Lavar declined to answer but also continued to deny Trump’s role on how the kids were able to come back to the states. Trump’s attempt to help the family with a deal with Lavar and the Chinese government. It did warrant a thank you if Trump did play a role in the release of the kids but the ego of Lavar seems to refuse to let anyone get the upper hand on him. This later resulted in a response from Trump saying that he should have let the kids sit in jail. Trump later did receive a thank you from the three basketball players at a press conference held by Ucla.

Donald Trump’s actions showed a sense of integrative agreement in which he could put himself in the spotlight as a public hero to the world and by saving Li Angelo and the other two kids from a hefty jail sentence would do the Ball family a huge favor. In this case it ultimately did not turn out the way Trump wanted do to the character of the man he was dealing with in Lavar Ball who is never afraid to stand up in front of a camera and say what he wants to say.

In my opinion I believe that these two men let their pride take over when it comes to what they do. Everything move they make today is viewed in the public and they seem to love the attention and making sure people know what they are up to. They are both going to be attracting this type of noise whether as the president or the NBA in terms of media. The two of them made sure they made headlines together when it came to this recent collision course.

-Paget Bramble

Citations

Hoffman, Benjamin. “Trump blasts Lavar Ball: I should have left them in jail” (2017, November 19) https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/19/sports/lavar-ball-trump.html

Haynes, Chris. “Donald Trump responds to LaVar Ball by tweeting he should have left UCLA players in jail”(2017, November 19) http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/21471202/us-president-donald-trump-tweets-response-lavar-ball

 

Business or Personal ? Lebron & Kyrie

When Kyrie Irving decided to leave the Cleveland Cavaliers for the Boston Celtics, it stuck a great controversy due to the fact that he didn’t talk to his teammate Lebron James about his decision. Lebron James is known as one of the best basketball players of all time and is basically the head of the Cleveland team.  In multiple interviews, Irving said that it “wasn’t anything personal” and said he didn’t have to talk to Lebron about it. In a recent article, Kyrie Irving explains how playing with other unbelievably talented players has increased his growth process in the NBA, and that he is simply ready to move on.

There are two psychological concepts that tie into this situation and they are self concept and individualism. Self concept is a belief or concept about oneself and Individualism is the way people identify themselves.  Irving wanting to move on to another team is an example of individualism because he identifies  himself as a good player and is focused on how well he is playing and what he can do. Self concept ties into this situation because Irving believes that he is better than he was when he first started and is now ready to leave and be better for another team.

In a statement made by Kevin Durant of the, Golden States Warriors, to yahoo sports he said:
“It’s just a regular NBA problem, right? A lot of teams have gone through  this before,” Durant told ESPN. “They’ll figure it out. That’s a great organization, a championship organization. They’ll figure it out.”

These situations tend to happen a lot within the NBA, which leads many to think that this is a business issue. Meanwhile others say that it is a personal issue.

 

References

http://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/20745983/nba-kyrie-irving-explains-trade-request-mo

https://sports.yahoo.com/kevin-durant-kyrie-irving-lebron-181540667.html

 

Genesis Carpio

Frustration, Aggression, & Baseball

Is losing what brings upon frustration and aggression or does frustration and aggression bring upon losing? Not only are the members of the Mets team upset, but their fans also are experiencing much frustration after a recent loss to the Nationals by 18 runs. This kind of brutal loss has the power to turn teammates against each other and cause internal and external problems for the team. Aggression and frustration is seen in many professional athletes due to their competitive nature. Aggression is the physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt someone else. Frustration is the blocking of goal-directed behavior. Together, these two ideas could be what causes a loss or the effect after a loss.

One probable cause to this ruthless game may be due to an injury faced by pitcher, Noah Syndergaard. This situation left not only Syndergaard frustrated, but the rest of his teammates, coaches, and managers. After the game, fingers started to be pointed and the responsibility was put on others out of frustration. The general manager of the Mets, Sandy Alderson, put the responsibility on Syndergaard for avoiding to get an MRI exam when his injury first began.  

Aggression and frustration often come hand in hand when related to sports. Frustration occurs when we are expecting gratification, but something is holding us back from that. The Mets have beat the Nationals two times before this game. They were expecting a win, and when something was blocking them from that aggression was seen through the team, coaches, and fans. The overall dynamics of the team and stadium dramatically changed as the star pitcher was taken out. This was most likely prevented the win that the Mets anticipated.

In a recent study researchers recognized that sport aggression, over the years, has become a major problem on and off the playing field. They directed a study comparing real life aggression and sport aggression. In the end, there were not many differences indicated. The hostility of both aggressions were similar. One difference that many may see as obvious, is female athletes do not show as much aggression as male athletes. This was proven to be true, however more hostility and competitiveness is seen in female athletes today. This may be due to the highly competitive nature to do what it takes to receive rewards for victories. We can see this behavior in professional athletes who are widely broadcasted, making the acts of aggression and frustration more common and easily accepted.  

 

 

 

Sources:

 

Keeler, L. A. (2007). The differences in sport aggression, life aggression, and life assertion among adult male and female collision, contact, and non-contact sport athletes. Journal of Sport Behavior,

Myers, D.G. (2015). Exploring Social Psychology: 7th Edition

Puma, M. (2017, April 30). Collins erupts after Mets see Noah Syndergaard nightmare. Retrieved May 02, 2017, from http://nypost.com/2017/04/30/this-looks-like-the-mets-noah-syndergaard-nightmare/

 

Rachel Platko

We Knew They’d Win

By: Jordan Benavides 

The city of Boston has been glorified by historic sports teams like The New England Patriots, which has pleased the city with five Super Bowl wins since 2002. Led by arguably the greatest quarterback of all-time Tom Brady and multiple players with Super Bowl experience, a 21-3 halftime deficit during Super Bowl LI was “obviously” nothing to worry about for their supporters and some players.

After the Patriots had completed the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history, many of their fans claimed “they knew it all along.” Even one of their own players, Matthew Slater claimed to be calm about the huge hole they had put themselves in. “No panic. We are squatting 80 percent of our maxes on Super Bowl week. We worked for this,” he said. Another one of their players, Chris Hogan said, “There wasn’t a doubt in my mind. We have one of the best quarterbacks that ever played the game.”

The look on most of the Patriots and even their fans didn’t express much confidence when they were down 25. Broadcasters praised the play of the Atlanta Falcons as cameras kept showing a look of defeat in the eyes of Tom Brady, who AFTER winning the game claimed he “wasn’t thinking much” when the Falcons went up 28-3 during the third quarter.

Optimism? Cockiness? Both? Or just your average case of the hindsight bias. Also humorously known as the I-knew-it-all-along phenomenon, hindsight bias occurs when we don’t expect something to happen, but when it does, we claim to have “known it all along.” The hindsight bias is composed of three levels. Memory distortion, inevitability, and foreseeability (Roese 2012).

These three levels were all clear and seen during Super Bowl LI.

Level One: Memory Distortion

There’s no question some Patriots and their fans had to have given up during the start of the 4th quarter. The second they finally tied the game, all those negative thoughts quickly disappeared.

Before comeback: “Damn, it’s over. We lost.”

After comeback: “I knew we’d come back!” (Previous opinion gone like it never came)

Level Two: Inevitability

One has to justify this complete change in opinion after the amazing comeback.

“The falcons didn’t have enough experience. Tom Brady’s the greatest, he played in 6 Super Bowls before this, he had to bring us back.”

Level Three: Foreseeability

“I knew we’d come back, and win!” (Or every other Patriot quote mentioned above)

The hindsight bias comes up frequently in sporting events, especially if you’re a “die hard” fan. Everyone loves “knowing” that it was going to happen, even after the majority has given up. Patriot nation didn’t look like they had much confidence when Stephen Gostkowski clanged the extra point field goal off the post to end the 3rd quarter. They didn’t look confident when Tom Brady was sacked for a fifth time during the 4th quarter. But with the Patriots being the historic franchise they are, who could have doubted this historic comeback???   

 References

Pells, E. (2017, February 6). Patriots Comeback Tops Them All. Retrieved February 10, 2017, from http://newbostonpost.com/2017/02/06/patriots-comeback-tops-them-all/

 

Roese, N. J. (2012). Hindsight Bias. Association For Psychological Science. Retrieved February 10, 2017, from http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1745691612454303

 

Tom Brady’s Super Bowl LI Press Conference, “Been on the Other Side of Those Catches”(2017,February 05). Retrieved February 13, 2017, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1pkGdGHKWM